150 Great Places to Work in Healthcare

from Becker’s Hospital Review

The list recognizes hospitals, health systems, and organizations committed to fulfilling missions, creating outstanding cultures, and offering competitive benefits to their employees. The organizations included encourage professional development among their employees and promote tomorrow’s leaders. Many members of this list have implemented employee recognition programs, mentorship and offer competitive benefits. The organizations coordinate employee and family outings as well as volunteering opportunities and provide community support.

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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

What’s Behind 2.5 Million New Health Jobs?

from Health Affairs

December 2007 marked the start of the most severe recession in modern times. For more than two years, the economy shed jobs. By the start of 2010, there were 8.6 million fewer jobs than at the start of the recession. These losses would have been greater had health care employment not continued to grow; jobs outside health care fell by 9.2 million while health care added nearly 600 thousand jobs. It took until November 2014 for non-health jobs to return to their pre-recession level, at which point health jobs had grown by 1.7 million. As of January 2017, there are 2.5 million more health jobs than at the start of the recession, an increase of 19 percent over a 9-year period during which the U.S. population grew by only 7 percent. While health jobs make up about 11 percent of total jobs, they have accounted for 35 percent of the jobs added since the start of the recession.

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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

What’s Changing in Modern Healthcare Education

by Eileen O’Shanassy

Technology is the main element working to change modern healthcare education and the healthcare industry at large. More medical students are going to school online or on a part or full time basis, and more professors are working online to post their lectures and conduct research using online resources. Knowing how to deal with trends that affect the ways that people learn and teach and the changes in the industry will make you a more valuable player in the field.

Methods of Learning 

The methods of healthcare learning are expanding thanks to the Internet. When classes are offered online, students are more likely to enroll and complete their studies. There are also hybrid courses that combine online and classroom methods of learning. Even though most medical classes must be completed in person, students can take a few online courses for convenience. This is especially helpful for cutting down on time spent in school getting a more involved or specialized degree.

Recordkeeping

Millions of medical records are available digitally for viewing by doctors and nurses only. Electronic medical records are easier to retrieve on computers and are indestructible in case of building fires or floods. Experts that specialize in EMR conversion technology have helped thousands of hospitals, doctor’s offices, and clinics that needed to make the transition from physical records. Students in health information technology and medical assisting should become more familiar with computers. They have to combine traditional recordkeeping with computer technology skills if they want to keep their jobs.

Student-Teacher Interactions

Students often find it easier to interact with teachers when using technology. More students are using phones to do their work, and need apps to access their studies online. Teachers need the convenience of mobile phones and emails to communicate with students and many use virtual learning tools to connect on an interactive level. For anatomy and physiology classes, there are software programs that provide medical simulations and three-dimensional models of the patient’s body.

Labs, Tests, and Experiments 

Technology has changed the experimental side of healthcare education. Teachers now have the tools to perform many laboratory experiments with detailed accuracy. Some nurses and surgeons work closely with computers in a technique known as computer-assisted surgery (CAS). Before surgery, doctors use computers to look at detailed, colorized scans of internal organs, and make diagnoses. Students of today are realizing that they have the opportunity to take greater risks and achieve better, faster results.

Technology has changed every facet of living in a modern society, and it has improved the results of healthcare education. Using computers, students get the education they want in a shorter period of time, and doctors make diagnoses more accurately. From pharmaceutical technology to biomedical engineering, every type of healthcare education benefits.


Eileen O’Shanassy is a freelance writer and blogger based out of Flagstaff, AZ. She writes on a variety of topics and loves to research and write. She enjoys baking, biking, and kayaking. Check out her Twitter, @eileenoshanassy.


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Healthcare Job Growth Remains Healthy in February

The healthcare sector added 26,800 jobs in February, according to the most recent jobs report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Here are three fast facts to know about one of the nation’s most consistently healthy industries when it comes to jobs.

  1. Ambulatory healthcare services made up the largest amount of employment growth in the industry, with employment growing by 18,300 jobs.
  2. Hospitals made up another large portion of the growth, accounting for 6,300 jobs—nearly a quarter of the total.
  3. In the last year, the healthcare industry has added an average of 30,000 jobs per month, with a total of 375,000 jobs added over the past 12 months.

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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

The West Coast is the Best Coast for Nurses in 2017

If you’re a nurse looking to not only make bank, but get the biggest bang for your buck, you may want to go west, or so says a study recently conducted by Indeed.

The study took a look at which cities paid nurses the most, and just how far those dollars went in each city, by calculating the average hourly salary for RNs in the U.S. from 2015 thru 2016 by metropolitan area and adjusting the annual salaries based on cost of living. According to that data, the west coast is the best coast for nurses. Nine out of the top ten locations for nurses were on the west coast, with half of the top cities residing in California, including the top four.

So, pack your bags and head out west—here are the top ten cities for nurses in 2017.

10. Seattle, WA
Average Salary Adjusted for Cost of Living: $65,856
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9. Houston, TX
Average Salary Adjusted for Cost of Living: $67,101
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8. Anchorage, AK
Average Salary Adjusted for Cost of Living: $68,158
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7. Phoenix, AZ
Average Salary Adjusted for Cost of Living: $72,548
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6. Riverside, CA
Average Salary Adjusted for Cost of Living: $73,742
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5. Portland, OR
Average Salary Adjusted for Cost of Living: $73,958
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4. Sacramento, CA
Average Salary Adjusted for Cost of Living: $76,870
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3. Modesto, CA
Average Salary Adjusted for Cost of Living: $80,368
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2. Bakersfield, CA
Average Salary Adjusted for Cost of Living: $80,731
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1. Fresno, CA
Average Salary Adjusted for Cost of Living: $81,344
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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

13 Résumé Mistakes

by Ruth Pankratz

An impressive résumé communicates a cohesive story about a professional. Every detail on a page contributes to the résumé while helping hiring managers quickly decide who to select for an interview. Avoid the following résumé mistakes.

  1. Inaccurate and incomplete contact information.
  2. Using an outdated résumé template with generic content.
  3. Creating résumé content that is not applicant tracking system (ATS) friendly.
  4. Selecting a difficult to read font.
  5. Overuse of bold and italic fonts.
  6. Emphasizing information using UPPERCASE LETTERS.
  7. Omitting work dates and other important dates.
  8. Not correcting poor grammar, spelling errors, and misused words.
  9. Including profanity, inappropriate statements, and unprofessional slang.
  10. Use of inappropriate graphics.
  11. Stating lies or overinflated achievements.
  12. Applying for jobs with an unfocused résumé.
  13. Only posting the résumé online and doing nothing else.
  14. Forgetting to bring a copy of the résumé to the interview.

By understanding that résumés are marketing documents, most mistakes can be easily corrected to create a targeted and effective résumé.


Ruth Pankratz is an international Master Résumé Writer, dual certified résumé writer, certified interview coach, and job search coach. Her résumés have won international awards and Ruth’s cover letters, résumés, and LinkedIn profiles have been included in a variety of publications. Contact Ruth at GabbyCommunications.com.


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

The Entry-Level Health Care Jobs Men Are (and Are Not) Taking

from Harvard Business Review

Since the 1970s the United States has shifted away from a manufacturing economy and toward a service-sector economy. This shift has been difficult for many workers, but especially for working-class men, who have been hurt by the loss of manufacturing and production jobs that have traditionally provided better wages, benefits, and job security than service-sector jobs. Indeed, the percentage of men working in manufacturing and production jobs — jobs that used to be “good jobs” for men without a college degree — has declined by over 50% since the 1970s, and men’s wages have dropped over the same time period.

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Top 10 Health Care Innovations

from Deloitte

Health care is an industry in need of innovation. Health plans, providers, life sciences companies, and the government are facing rising costs and inconsistent outcomes. They are working to improve care and health outcomes, all while reducing costs and spending. What innovations are most likely to help stakeholders achieve these goals and transform health care over the next 10 years?

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